TestMarket - Act Now! The Fragile Earth: Writing from the New Yorker on Climate Change - Save 36%!

Act Now! The Fragile Earth: Writing from the New Yorker on Climate Change - Save 36%!

Date:
Jan 14, 2024 03:33 pm
Act Now! The Fragile Earth: Writing from the New Yorker on Climate Change - Save 36%!
Category: Botany & Plant Sciences
Seller Name: Amazon Warehouse
Rating: 4.80
Total Rating Count: 109
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Title: The very definition of "urgent"
Content: In a way, it's hard to put my thoughts about this book into words. I don't think I can do better than what the publisher has already said: this collection of essays is urgent. So very, very urgent. I've never read The New Yorker beyond the odd online article or two. So what an excellent idea this book is - to reach new audiences. I'd heard of writers/journalists like Bill McKibben, but to my shame, I'd never actually read his work. Now, while I may be the choir this book is preaching to, I still learned many new things; and I saw familiar things through new lenses. The book is actually a little hard-going at the beginning, and I think that's because the first two essays (by Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert) aren't particularly "grounded" - they don't focus on any particular events or places. That isn't to say they aren't powerful, and eloquently, passionately written. Yet I really hit my reading stride when the essays took me to far-away lands: a glacier in India, Inuits in Alaska, solar-power users in Tanzania, fire managers in California. Each of these essays captivated me. Many terrified me. In fact, this book has probably sealed my decision not to have a child. The thought of bringing a new person into this almost-certainly doomed world (as we know it) is unbearable. There is little comfort to be found in this book. If you're looking for cherry-picked optimism, try something like Gaia Vince's 'Adventures in the Anthropocene'. Reading 'The Fragile Earth', meanwhile, felt like bearing witness.
Rating:
Title: The very definition of "urgent"
Content: In a way, it's hard to put my thoughts about this book into words. I don't think I can do better than what the publisher has already said: this collection of essays is urgent. So very, very urgent. I've never read The New Yorker beyond the odd online article or two. So what an excellent idea this book is - to reach new audiences. I'd heard of writers/journalists like Bill McKibben, but to my shame, I'd never actually read his work. Now, while I may be the choir this book is preaching to, I still learned many new things; and I saw familiar things through new lenses. The book is actually a little hard-going at the beginning, and I think that's because the first two essays (by Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert) aren't particularly "grounded" - they don't focus on any particular events or places. That isn't to say they aren't powerful, and eloquently, passionately written. Yet I really hit my reading stride when the essays took me to far-away lands: a glacier in India, Inuits in Alaska, solar-power users in Tanzania, fire managers in California. Each of these essays captivated me. Many terrified me. In fact, this book has probably sealed my decision not to have a child. The thought of bringing a new person into this almost-certainly doomed world (as we know it) is unbearable. There is little comfort to be found in this book. If you're looking for cherry-picked optimism, try something like Gaia Vince's 'Adventures in the Anthropocene'. Reading 'The Fragile Earth', meanwhile, felt like bearing witness.
Rating:
Title: The very definition of "urgent"
Content: In a way, it's hard to put my thoughts about this book into words. I don't think I can do better than what the publisher has already said: this collection of essays is urgent. So very, very urgent. I've never read The New Yorker beyond the odd online article or two. So what an excellent idea this book is - to reach new audiences. I'd heard of writers/journalists like Bill McKibben, but to my shame, I'd never actually read his work. Now, while I may be the choir this book is preaching to, I still learned many new things; and I saw familiar things through new lenses. The book is actually a little hard-going at the beginning, and I think that's because the first two essays (by Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert) aren't particularly "grounded" - they don't focus on any particular events or places. That isn't to say they aren't powerful, and eloquently, passionately written. Yet I really hit my reading stride when the essays took me to far-away lands: a glacier in India, Inuits in Alaska, solar-power users in Tanzania, fire managers in California. Each of these essays captivated me. Many terrified me. In fact, this book has probably sealed my decision not to have a child. The thought of bringing a new person into this almost-certainly doomed world (as we know it) is unbearable. There is little comfort to be found in this book. If you're looking for cherry-picked optimism, try something like Gaia Vince's 'Adventures in the Anthropocene'. Reading 'The Fragile Earth', meanwhile, felt like bearing witness.
Rating:

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