TestMarket - Last Chance! The Village Effect: Why Face-to-Face Contact Matters - Save 40% Now!

Last Chance! The Village Effect: Why Face-to-Face Contact Matters - Save 40% Now!

Date:
Jan 14, 2024 07:30 pm
Last Chance! The Village Effect: Why Face-to-Face Contact Matters - Save 40% Now!
Category: Anthropology
Seller Name: WeBuyBooks
Rating: 4.30
Total Rating Count: 115
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Experience the power of social connection with The Village Effect: Why Face-to-Face Contact Matters. Discover the profound impact of genuine human interaction in this eye-opening book. Limited-time offer - get it now for only £9.06 (40% off the original price of £14.99). Don't miss your chance to save £5.93 and unlock the secrets of human connection. Act fast as this deal won't last long!

Title: Having a local community is crucial
Content: Excellent read and makes perfect sense, this book should be compulsory reading for all social workers, health care and care staff working with people with learning disabilities
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Title: I was so impressed with this book, that I ...
Content: I was so impressed with this book, that I persuaded my women's group to all read it and we will be discussing it in February.
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Title: Very readable - thought provoking...
Content: A synthesis of a variety of research into why some communities don' t seem to suffer from the high levels of dementia spectrum illnesses in old age which we do. Well written in accessible language for the lay person.
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Title: two quite different arguments
Content: I was motivated to read this book because when the author appeared on BBC radio to plug it, her thesis controverted what I've read elsewhere. Unfortunately the book misses the mark in one big respect - it does not distinguish between two very different arguments. (a) People vary in the social interactions they require for their physical and mental wellbeing. (b) People vary in the social interactions they THINK they require for their physical and mental wellbeing. Now I am quite prepared to accept that when someone is distressed by spending so much time on their own, then this is bad for them. I cannot however tell from this book if, when someone is very happy and contented with their own company, then they are somehow stacking up serious health problems. The author herself states (p.12) that a feeling of loneliness could be an early warning system - designed to get us to change our behaviour or environment. This is fair enough. But there are many people who spend lengthy periods alone, and yet do not feel lonely. The author mentions a well-known book, 'Solitude' by Anthony Storr, which subverts her own argument, and yet oddly she does not at all engage with it. Storr's thesis is that creative people are quite happy following their creative drives, thank you. Creative activities (musicianship, art, poems, novels, etc.) are predominantly solitary in nature - you don't write novels at night clubs, parties, barbecues or bowling alleys. For such persons, their creative works rather than their personal relationships are their primary source of self-esteem and fulfillment. (Edward Gibbon: 'Solitude is the school of genius.') The obvious approach would've been to establish whether creative persons tend to get ill more readily or die younger. This would be difficult to do in practical terms of course, but it would provide a way of testing her thesis. Pinker does not do this. Another way of testing her thesis is via personality trait. But the argument advanced (p.292) is not fully developed. The notion that introverts find it 'hard to initiate and cultivate relationships' confuses introversion ('not needing social interaction') with shyness ('fearful of social interaction'); a common error. In 'Personality - what makes you the way you are' by Daniel Nettle, it is alleged that, because of some unidentified lifestyle factor, and quite contrary to Pinker's findings, extroverts die younger than introverts. More fairly the argument could've been broadened out to include the other well-known personality traits - agreeableness, neuroticism, etc. Agreeableness is the better predictor for how relationships will go; as distinct from extroversion. Neuroticism, if we mean a 'tendency to worry' or 'to be anxious', I should've thought the best driver of morbidity and mortality - but this is not examined. Continual worrying will put the body in a chronically stressed state; this is a well-known heath predictor. The author's thesis would then reduce to simply this: loneliness causes stress, and stress causes illness. But not everyone gets stressed by being alone! The author says (p.291) that she's now changed her lifestyle, not staying at home and reading in the evening, but building in social activity, in the way we do exercise. But I find it difficult to believe that, if you're happy and contented when spending many hours on your own - tending to your garden, writing a novel, reading or listening to music, and multitudes of other activities, then you're somehow putting yourself in an early grave. Goals and motivations in life offer another angle to test the thesis. If I opened my eyes every morning and had no idea of how to occupy myself for the next sixteen hours, that would be quite different. The type of solitariness should be carefully qualified (p.315): coming and going as you please, should not be confused with solitary incarceration. The Sardinian mountain village (from which the book derives its title) is not to my mind a pleasant place. A man cannot go about his affairs without curtains twitching, and having his private comings and goings gossiped about. For me that would be a stressful and not stress-free environment.
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Title: Five Stars
Content: very interesting book but I wish I had bought the paperback instead of the kindle version.
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Title: Good Read
Content: Excellent in depth and intuitive and insightful read
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Title: Having a local community is crucial
Content: Excellent read and makes perfect sense, this book should be compulsory reading for all social workers, health care and care staff working with people with learning disabilities
Rating:

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