TestMarket - Discover the Epic Tale of King Arthur and Save 29% on The Complete King Arthur: Many Faces, One Hero

Discover the Epic Tale of King Arthur and Save 29% on The Complete King Arthur: Many Faces, One Hero

Date:
Jan 14, 2024 04:47 pm
Discover the Epic Tale of King Arthur and Save 29% on The Complete King Arthur: Many Faces, One Hero
Category: Anthropology
Seller Name: London Bridge Books
Rating: 4.20
Total Rating Count: 28
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Title: Comprehensive
Content: Most extraordinary reference book to the timeline of the historical and legendary King Arthur . Im not surprised John and Caitlin have been at this years and their work is certainly a kernel of wheat amongst the chaff . I have many books on King Arthur and the Dark ages but this one stands pride of place and unfortunately will soon be tatty as i keep having to look things up in it.
Rating:
Title: A welcomed addition to my shelf!!
Content: What did I think of the book? The Complete King Arthur: Many Faces, One Hero, is a comprehensive look at the many different persona’s of King Arthur. I have read many books from notable scholars on the subject of Arthur, so I was looking forward to seeing what John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews had to say for themselves. I was hoping for something fresh and easy to read, I got that. The authors do not claim to have found Arthur, this isn’t that type of book, although I got the impression the authors were leaning towards the Roman Centurion, Artorius Castus, as a probable candidate! This book covers a vast period, from Roman occupation of Britain, to now, which is a long period of history to cover, but I have to commend John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews, for they did it remarkably well. This book looks at how Arthur has changed through the ages and how he has been used, to some extent, for political purposes. It also shows us how Arthur ‘the man’ was turned into Arthur ‘the legend’ and how the ancient texts were possibly misinterpreted. So as with anything to do with Arthur you expect to look at the works of Gildas, Nennius, Bede, etc... which this book does, and John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews have come up with some really interesting thesis as they interpret what they think this writing is, and isn’t, telling us. The authors arguments are very compelling, and I have to admit I had this book in one hand, and the rest of my vast Arthurian collection spread out before me while I cross-referenced. And for the most part, I found myself agreeing with what John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews have so elegantly put forward as an argument. Their interpretation makes sense. This book spends a long time looking at Nennius’s 12 famous battles and how these "battles" have been interpreted / miss-interpreted over time, and, more importantly, what they say about the political landscape that they are set in. I thought the authors were right to dedicate this amount of time to these battles and for those new to Arthurian Legend this would be enlightening. The book takes us on a journey and show us how Arthur changed over time from a soldier to a king, and it pays particular attention to the great poets, who of course, were responsible for this change. There is a fascinating chapter on Geoffrey of Monmouth, who is the founding father of the somewhat fictitious Arthur that we would recognise today. The authors look in great detail at Monmouth’s life and where he got his facts from - that missing ancient manuscript raises its head again - and more importantly, they look at why Monmouth wrote it in the first place. The authors show the two sides of Arthur — the Christian King, and the spoilt, arrogant, almost evil Arthur that he was sometimes portrayed as. The book looks at principle players in Arthurian Legend as well - Kay, Mordred, Bedivere, Gawain, and Lancelot, as well as Arthur's Queen, all get a mention and as with Arthur, the authors demonstrate where the 'historical' characters came from, and which ones have a rather fictitious beginning! I thought this book was very well thought out, there are lots of amazing images, a very useful timeline, maps, and everything is chronicled in order, so you really do need to start at the beginning as there is a lot of references to earlier chapters. This is a book that is suitable for those who are just starting out on their Arthurian journey, as well as those that are well on their way into their research. This is a book that I am going to come back to again. It is a welcomed addition to my shelf. I Highly Recommend. *I received an ARC of this book via Netgalley, for review consideration*
Rating:
Title: Misleading for the Arthurian Novice
Content: A very misleading book for readers new to the Arthurian Legend; the book is biased throughout toward a Northern Arthur in support of the argument that 'Lucius Artorius Castus is the original of King Arthur' theory. Perhaps not surprising seeing that John Matthews is one of the main proponents for the recent resurgence of the theory that the Arthurian legend has it roots in a Roman officer who was stationed in Britain in the 2nd Century. For example, the authors present a new interpretation of of Kadeir Teyrnon, The Sovereign's Chair by Taliesin in which they present Arthur as fighting along Hadrian's Wall. This new interpretation of Taliesin's poem has significant differences to the more recent modern translations of Haycock and Williams and seemingly based on Skene's outdated translation and clearly influenced by the authors' bias toward a Northern Arthur rather than accuracy of translation. As Matthews is an established author and produced a multitude of books many novices will regard him as an authority on the Arthurian enigma making it even more disappointing that he should produce a book titled "The Complete King Arthur" when it is overtly biased toward one stream of the legend. Perhaps a more suitable title would have been something like, "The Case for the Arthur of the North". So don't start your studies with this book but read Tony Sullivan King Arthur: Many or Myth first for an unbiased view of all the faces of Arthur.
Rating:
Title: Comprehensive
Content: Most extraordinary reference book to the timeline of the historical and legendary King Arthur . Im not surprised John and Caitlin have been at this years and their work is certainly a kernel of wheat amongst the chaff . I have many books on King Arthur and the Dark ages but this one stands pride of place and unfortunately will soon be tatty as i keep having to look things up in it.
Rating:
Title: A welcomed addition to my shelf!!
Content: What did I think of the book? The Complete King Arthur: Many Faces, One Hero, is a comprehensive look at the many different persona’s of King Arthur. I have read many books from notable scholars on the subject of Arthur, so I was looking forward to seeing what John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews had to say for themselves. I was hoping for something fresh and easy to read, I got that. The authors do not claim to have found Arthur, this isn’t that type of book, although I got the impression the authors were leaning towards the Roman Centurion, Artorius Castus, as a probable candidate! This book covers a vast period, from Roman occupation of Britain, to now, which is a long period of history to cover, but I have to commend John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews, for they did it remarkably well. This book looks at how Arthur has changed through the ages and how he has been used, to some extent, for political purposes. It also shows us how Arthur ‘the man’ was turned into Arthur ‘the legend’ and how the ancient texts were possibly misinterpreted. So as with anything to do with Arthur you expect to look at the works of Gildas, Nennius, Bede, etc... which this book does, and John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews have come up with some really interesting thesis as they interpret what they think this writing is, and isn’t, telling us. The authors arguments are very compelling, and I have to admit I had this book in one hand, and the rest of my vast Arthurian collection spread out before me while I cross-referenced. And for the most part, I found myself agreeing with what John Matthews and Caitlín Matthews have so elegantly put forward as an argument. Their interpretation makes sense. This book spends a long time looking at Nennius’s 12 famous battles and how these "battles" have been interpreted / miss-interpreted over time, and, more importantly, what they say about the political landscape that they are set in. I thought the authors were right to dedicate this amount of time to these battles and for those new to Arthurian Legend this would be enlightening. The book takes us on a journey and show us how Arthur changed over time from a soldier to a king, and it pays particular attention to the great poets, who of course, were responsible for this change. There is a fascinating chapter on Geoffrey of Monmouth, who is the founding father of the somewhat fictitious Arthur that we would recognise today. The authors look in great detail at Monmouth’s life and where he got his facts from - that missing ancient manuscript raises its head again - and more importantly, they look at why Monmouth wrote it in the first place. The authors show the two sides of Arthur — the Christian King, and the spoilt, arrogant, almost evil Arthur that he was sometimes portrayed as. The book looks at principle players in Arthurian Legend as well - Kay, Mordred, Bedivere, Gawain, and Lancelot, as well as Arthur's Queen, all get a mention and as with Arthur, the authors demonstrate where the 'historical' characters came from, and which ones have a rather fictitious beginning! I thought this book was very well thought out, there are lots of amazing images, a very useful timeline, maps, and everything is chronicled in order, so you really do need to start at the beginning as there is a lot of references to earlier chapters. This is a book that is suitable for those who are just starting out on their Arthurian journey, as well as those that are well on their way into their research. This is a book that I am going to come back to again. It is a welcomed addition to my shelf. I Highly Recommend. *I received an ARC of this book via Netgalley, for review consideration*
Rating:
Title: Misleading for the Arthurian Novice
Content: A very misleading book for readers new to the Arthurian Legend; the book is biased throughout toward a Northern Arthur in support of the argument that 'Lucius Artorius Castus is the original of King Arthur' theory. Perhaps not surprising seeing that John Matthews is one of the main proponents for the recent resurgence of the theory that the Arthurian legend has it roots in a Roman officer who was stationed in Britain in the 2nd Century. For example, the authors present a new interpretation of of Kadeir Teyrnon, The Sovereign's Chair by Taliesin in which they present Arthur as fighting along Hadrian's Wall. This new interpretation of Taliesin's poem has significant differences to the more recent modern translations of Haycock and Williams and seemingly based on Skene's outdated translation and clearly influenced by the authors' bias toward a Northern Arthur rather than accuracy of translation. As Matthews is an established author and produced a multitude of books many novices will regard him as an authority on the Arthurian enigma making it even more disappointing that he should produce a book titled "The Complete King Arthur" when it is overtly biased toward one stream of the legend. Perhaps a more suitable title would have been something like, "The Case for the Arthur of the North". So don't start your studies with this book but read Tony Sullivan King Arthur: Many or Myth first for an unbiased view of all the faces of Arthur.
Rating:
Title: Comprehensive
Content: Most extraordinary reference book to the timeline of the historical and legendary King Arthur . Im not surprised John and Caitlin have been at this years and their work is certainly a kernel of wheat amongst the chaff . I have many books on King Arthur and the Dark ages but this one stands pride of place and unfortunately will soon be tatty as i keep having to look things up in it.
Rating:

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